Remembering Ludlow

Remembering Ludlow

Great article published recently in Colorado Country Life Magazine about the 100th anniversary of the Ludlow Massacre in April 1914.

 

 
Published in: on April 15, 2014 at 10:15 am  Comments Off on Remembering Ludlow  
Tags: , ,

Ludlow, 98 years ago

On April 20, 1914, in Ludlow Colorado, state National Guard troops fired upon striking immigrants that worked in the coal mines. The massacre resulted in the violent deaths of between 19 and 25 people; sources vary but all sources include two women and eleven children, asphyxiated and burned to death under a single tent. In retaliation, miners armed themselves and attacked dozens of mines over the next ten days, destroying property and engaging in several skirmishes with the Colorado National Guard along a 40-mile front from Trinidad to Walsenburg. It only ended when US regulars were sent in to disarm both the National Guard and miners. The entire war would cost between 69 and 199 lives, described as the “deadliest strike in the history of the United States”.

Published in: on April 18, 2012 at 3:43 pm  Comments (1)  
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Miner’s Double Buckle Boots

 

Since trousers tend to be the first piece of clothing that suffers from day to day wear, workers came up with some pretty inventive ways to keep their clothing in the best of shape as possible.

If one looks closely at these photos of five male employees of the Rocky Mountain Fuel Company in Colorado (circa: 1910-1930), some of the miners have ankle boots similar to the M43 US combat boot.

Boots with ankle gaiters were sometimes worn by workers in the early 20th century in order to prevent the trousers from getting caught up in debris, branches, etc.

19756882_10210127338996273_5893291268127289384_n

This ad from the mid-to late 1920s also shows an example of the double buckle boots from the era.

Published in: on January 1, 2012 at 1:43 pm  Comments Off on Miner’s Double Buckle Boots  
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Ludlow Massacre

While the Ludlow Massacre in Colorado was almost ten years before Blair Mountain, the miners were fighting for the same right to organize a union in the coal mines.The Ludlow Massacre resulted in the violent deaths of 19 people during an attack by the Colorado National Guard on a tent colony of 1,200 striking coal miners and their families at Ludlow, Colorado on April 20, 1914. The deaths occurred after a day-long fight between strikers and the Guard. Two women and eleven children were asphyxiated and burned to death. Three union leaders and two strikers were killed by gunfire, along with one child, one passer-by, and one National Guardsman. In response, the miners armed themselves and attacked dozens of mines, destroying property and engaging in several skirmishes with the Colorado National Guard.

In response to the Ludlow massacre, the leaders of organized labor in Colorado issued a call to arms, urging union members to acquire “all the arms and ammunition legally available,” and a large-scale guerrilla war ensued, lasting ten days. In Trinidad, Colorado, UMWA officials openly distributed arms and ammunition to strikers at union headquarters. 700 to 1,000 strikers “attacked mine after mine, driving off or killing the guards and setting fire to the buildings.” At least fifty people, including those at Ludlow, were killed in ten days of fighting against mine guards and hundreds of militia reinforcements rushed back into the strike zone. The fighting ended only when US President Woodrow Wilson sent in Federal troops.The troops, who reported directly to Washington, DC, disarmed both sides, displacing and often arresting the militia in the process.

This conflict, called the Colorado Coalfield War, was the most violent labor conflict in US history; the reported death toll ranged from 69-199.

Published in: on June 8, 2011 at 8:23 pm  Comments Off on Ludlow Massacre  
Tags: , , , ,